Rose by Harriet Alger, other photos by John Koscinski

304 West Avenue

http://www.blackriveraudubon.org

Elyria, OH  44035

440-322-0820

EDITORS: JACK SMITH / HARRY SPENCER.  PHOTOGRAPHER: JOHN KOSCINSKI

November 07Program

Carlisle Visitors’ Center, 7 PM Tuesday, November 6

Eagles, Ospreys, and Falcons:Interesting Cases

Laura Jordan, Executive Director, Medina Raptor Center

Laura Jordan and her husband have been rehabilitating birds for twenty years and founded the Medina Raptor Center in 1990. MRC is a licensed non-profit organization that depends solely on the generosity of contributors, the donations of services by skilled veterinarians, and countless hours provided by volunteers. The Jordans specialize in rehabilitation of birds of prey and Ohio’s Endangered Spices.

Field Trip

Wellington Reservation and Upground Reservoir

Meet at the Visitors' Center parking lot.

Saturday, November 10, 9 AM

The Western Cuyahoga Audubon Society will join us for this hike. Welcome Western Cuyahoga Audubon!

Young Birders Hike

Sandy Ridge Reservation

Saturday, November 10, 8 AM

Audubon Prestigious Lecture Series

Visitors' Center, Carlisle Visitors Center

Saturday, November 17, 7 PM

Making a Difference

Mona Rutger

Back to the Wild

Rehab Center

Animal Planet's Hero of the Year

            Mona Rutger started her career as a wildlife rehabilitator literally on the wing and a prayer. Her diligence and strong educational ethic have turned her quiet Castalia property into an amazing menagerie cleverly called Back to the Wild. Her dedication has also transformed her life as well; wildlife rescues replaced vacations; midnight feedings replaced sleep. On the upside, she has provided an 'in' for wildlife and an 'out' for often over-zealous people. It is through her live animal programs that she has her best chance to change the opinions and practices of people and help them make a difference. For all of this, she currently wears the banner of Animal Planet's prestigious Hero of the Year title.

Board Meeting

Oberlin Depot

Tuesday, November 27, 6:30 PM

September 15 Field Trip

Sandy Ridge Reservation

With a cool north wind blowing briskly, Tim Fairweather led six members  through the woods and around the ponds. Few birds were seen or heard in the northern portion of the woods, but in the southern portion, which is protected from the winds, we spotted several warblers: Nashville, Chestnut-sided, Magnolia, Yellow-rumped, Black-throated Green, Blackburnian, Blackpoll, American Redstart, and Common Yellowthroat.

In addition Canada Goose, Wood Duck, American Wigeon, Mallard, Northern Shoveler, Northern Pintail, Green-winged Teal, and Pied-billed Grebe swam in the ponds, where Great Blue Heron, Great Egret, and Green Heron waded. We identified Sora along the edges.

Our quest for shore birds was unsuccessful until a couple of our group spotted one flying along the far shore of the eastern pond. Finally the bird landed in the water, and a birder announced that it was diving. Tim immediately became intensely interested, stating that the bird must be a phalarope. He soon spotted the bird through his scope and identified it as a Red-necked Phalarope. Its fall plumage, white underside, gray topside, and facial black patch, could be clearly seen through the scope.

This sighting was the high point of our outing.

Additional birds identified were Mourning Dove, Chimney Swift, Ruby-throated Hummingbird, Belted Kingfisher, Red-headed Woodpecker, Downy Woodpecker, Hairy Woodpecker Eastern Wood-Pewee, Acadian Flycatcher, Yellow-throated Vireo, Warbling Vireo, and Red-eyed Vireo.

Other species seen or heard were Blue Jay, American Crow, Barn Swallow, Black-capped Chickadee, Tufted Titmouse, Red-breasted Nuthatch, Blue-gray Gnatcatcher, American Robin, European Starling, Song Sparrow, Northern Cardinal, Red-winged Blackbird, American Goldfinch, and House Sparrow (Total species  52).

September 25 Board Meeting

Oberlin Depot

The five members attending, Harriet Alger, Jack Smith, Arlene Ryan, Joe Strong, and Jean Sorton, did not constitute a quorum, so no official business was transacted. Those attending, however, discussed some items of importance.

Harriet presented the final budget 2007/08. After some discussion, those in attendance agreed with the budget plan.

The coordinator of the last few Wellington Christmas Bird Counts, Larry Morton, has moved some 40 miles away and feels that he cannot continue in his coordinator role.  Jack Smith volunteered to assume the job for this year’s Wellington CBC.

Because Hog Island Scholarship recipients, particularly the most recent, are actively contributing to ecological education in Lorain and Medina Counties, ways for increasing the availability of the scholarships were discussed. All agreed that we should continue to recruit suitable recipients of the scholarship and that the number of scholarships offered this year should be two.

President Harriet Alger reported that because of his increased work commitments, John Koscinski reluctantly resigned from Board membership. His replacement will be identified.

Birders Alphabet

V Vitelline membrane

At the time a bird’s egg is laid, the yellowish yolk and white albumen fill the shell. The yolk is a mixture of proteins, fats and carbohydrates, and on top of it lies a tiny blob of protoplasm from which the embryo will develop. The yolk and protoplasm are enclosed in a transparent bag, the vitelline membrane, which keeps the yolk and egg white separated.

As the embryo develops the egg white keeps it moist, while the yolk provides a food supply. The vitelline membrane develops vitelline veins which carry nutrients from the yolk to the embryo. As the embryo continues to develop the albumin and yolk begin to shrink until at the time of hatching they have disappeared.

Wanted!

Third- to sixth-grade classroom teachers and homeschoolers to use FREE Audubon

Adventures kits!

The goal of Audubon Adventures is to develop in young people an appreciation, awareness, and understanding of the natural world—birds, other wildlife, and all living things. A theme is the connection between people and nature.

Audubon Adventure kits are keyed to the State of Ohio proficiency requirements. The theme for this year is “Back from the brink: Success Stories of the Endangered Species Act”. Featured are the Bald Eagle, American Alligator, Grizzly Bear, and the Gray Whale.

           Black River Audubon Society offers these kits free! All teachers and homeschoolers need to do is apply. The materials will be sent directly to your school or home. For information or to apply, contact Dick Lee at LeeDck@aol.com  or 440-322-7449.

John’s Prizes

In July and August, John Koscinski won two firsts and a second in three photo contests. Locally in Sandy Ridge’s annual contest, he won first prize for a photo of goslings. In Florida in a contest for professional photographers sponsored by the Miami Chamber of Commerce, his photo of a Greater Flamingo, shown below, won a $500 first prize. In addition he won second prize at Geauga County’s Westwood Park.

Congratulations, John!

                                                                                 

                                                      

Greater Flamingo photo by John Koscinski

Bent Mandible: Greater Flamingo

(Phoenicopterus ruber)

By Jack Smith

The unusual downward-bent shape of a Greater Flamingo’s bill provides the bird with a most useful tool. The lower mandible forms a large open box containing a tongue. The upper mandible is lined with fine serrations and forms a tight fitting lid to the box. This remarkable bill is vividly illustrated by John Koscinski’s prize-winning photo shown above.

Flamingos feed while wading in water. Often with its head submerged a bird skims the bottom with the bent bill-tip. With the aid of its large fleshy tongue, the bird pumps water through its bill, filtering out food including small mollusks, crustaceans, insects, fishes, plankton, bacteria and vegetable matter.

This method of feeding is believed to be an evolutionary adaptation made over millions of years. When the young hatch, their bills are straight, turning at the end only after about forty days.

In zoos keepers grind carrots, meat, and other high protein food and throw it into shallow water for their flamingos. The birds use their straining method to obtain food. The carrots provide carotene to help the birds retain their red-pink color.

The Greater Flamingo genus name, Phoenicopterus, is derived from the Greek Phoenix, the mythical red bird, and the species name, ruber, is Latin for red.

Years ago while camping near the Flamingo Visitor’s Center of Everglades National Park, I observed a small flamingo flock using their unusual skimming technique to feed in shallow salt waters of a bay.

A Greater Flamingo is a large bird, 36 to 50 inches in length with a wingspread of about five feet. Males and females look alike except for size: Males average about eight pounds and females six-and-a-half. Flight feathers are black, body feathers vary from gray to shades of pink and vermilion. Legs and feet are pink. The webbed three front toes assist swimming.  Its sinuous neck and legs are each longer relative to body length than that of any other bird.

When flying, flamingos give a characteristic honk-like call, huh huh huh, and the combined sound of  many individual calls within a flock may sound like a frog chorus.

Flamingos are monogamous breeders and colony nesters. Separated from each other by only two feet or less, nests are built in marl and mud flats. With some help from the male, the female uses her crooked beak to pile mud into a volcano-shaped nest 6 to 18 inches high and 17 to 20 inches in diameter. She usually lays one chalky white egg that she incubates for 28 to 32 days. For three or four days, both parents feed the hatchling a nutritious red liquid secreted by glands in their digestive tracts. Then the parents herd the chick into a group of chicks called a crèche. The young fly after 75 or so days.

Estimates of the number of birds in the Caribbean and West Indies, where the birds are native, have increased from about 12,000 in 1971 to 80,000 today. Probably this increase is due to international protection programs. (The wild flamingos of Florida, such as the bird pictured on the cover, are not native birds.)

Yet the birds are vulnerable to various hazards. Because their nests are built in mud flats near water, the flamingos are affected by rising water. Colonies of 1000 or more birds can be wiped out in a single hurricane. Because of their valuable feathers, the birds are still hunted. Because they lose all their flight feathers during molting, the birds are temporarily flightless and vulnerable to various predators.

        

                                                

                                     Cedar Waxwing photo by John Koscinski

North American Nomad: Cedar Waxwing

(Bombycilla cedorum)

By Jack Smith

Donald and Lillian Stokes’ describe the Cedar Waxwing as “one of our loveliest birds, its colors so blended and feathers so sleek, it has the appearance of a skillfully painted carving.” I agree! As many times as I have seen this bird, I still want to take time to marvel at its beauty.

The genus name, Bombycilla, means silky-tailed in both Greek and Latin, and the species name, cedorum, is Latin for cedar. Waxwings are so-named because of the red waxy droplets at the end of their secondary flight feathers.

Cedar Waxwings are socially oriented and colony nesters. These nomadic birds move from east to west, west to east, north to south, and south to north. They search for trees and shrubs with sugary berries across continental United States, including southern Alaska. Their summer range also includes southern Canada. Its close relative, the larger Bohemian Waxwing is mostly a northwestern bird.

The flocking behavior is probably an evolutionary adaptation to the detection of scattered patches of berries and insects.  Flocks of birds are more successful than individuals. Insects are snatched in mid-air by the birds acting similarly to flycatchers.

A Cedar Waxwing is slightly smaller than a robin, 6 ½ to 8-inches in length with a wingspan of 11 to 12 ¼-inches. The above photo illustrates the black mask and head crest, the sleek brown sides and belly, the gray wings, and some of the waxy red feather-tips. John Koscinski captured this bird in all its glory.

Males and females look much alike, but instead of the male’s black throat, a female has a browner one. Such subtle color differences are rarely noticeable in the field.

While socializing, Cedar Waxwings are very vocal with high-pitched hissing-whistles. Stokes describes these sounds as the “See-call” and the “Tseah-call.

The birds form mate-pairs while in groups of socializing birds in a berry tree or shrub. Stokes indicates that during this summer pairing, the birds perform a “Side hop display”. In this display either the male or female may hop along a branch, approaching a bird of opposite sex, offering a berry. The recipient takes the berry, hops away, hops back, and offers the berry back. These exchanges may occur several times before one of the birds eats the berry. With fascination, I enjoy watching this dramatic courtship behavior.

After successful pairing, the couple flies to a nearby tree or shrub to mate and build a nest in a fork. Other pairs, perhaps as many as a dozen, may share the same tree or shrub.  A nest may consist of twigs, dry grasses, weed stalks, mosses, lichens, pine needles, and wool-like fibers. Birds may even take pieces of string or yarn from human hands. In fact, some have reported that waxwings will pluck hairs from women’s heads. Nests are built near sources of food.

Waxwings are late nesters during June through September when berries are ripening.

The female lays 3 to 5 pale gray or blue-gray eggs and incubates them for 12 to 16 days. Young birds fledge after 14 to 18-days. Simultaneous with this process at one nest, the female may start construction of a new nest, and may even begin incubating eggs in the new nest while young birds remain in the old one.

Both parents feed nestlings a diet of berries and insects. If a second family is started, however, only the male will feed the nestling in the second nest. 

Waxwings rarely host cowbirds. The waxwings apparently recognize the imposter’s eggs and destroy them.

Since the banning of DDT in the 1970s, population numbers of waxwings have been increasing sharply. Breeding-bird surveys indicate that the species are not currently threatened or endangered.

September 2007 Birding

For eight sites (Black River Reservation, Bacon Woods, Carlisle Reservation, French Creek Reservation, Lorain Harbor, Sandy Ridge Reservation, Wellington Reservation, and Wellington Upground Reservoir) Black River Audubon members filed sixty checklists on eBird during September 2007. Those checklists included 128 species. For all of Ohio, our eBird entries represent 14% of the checklists and 60% of the species.

Bold entries in the following list designate species identified on 30 or more of the 60 checklists, underlining indicates listing on 6 to 29 checklists, italicized species in smaller font specifies only a single identification, and the regular font with neither bold nor italicized emphasis designates those species identified on 2 to 6 checklists.

CANADA GOOSE, WOOD DUCK, AMERICAN BLACK DUCK, MALLARD, BLUE-WINGED TEAL, NORTHERN SHOVELER, NORTHERN PINTAIL, GREEN-WINGED TEAL,

WILD TURKEY, PIED-BILLED GREBE, DOUBLE-CRESTED CORMORANT, GREAT BLUE HERON, GREAT EGRET, GREEN HERON, TURKEY VULTURE, OSPREY, BALD EAGLE, NORTHERN HARRIER, SHARP-SHINNED HAWK, COOPER’S HAWK, RED-SHOULDERED HAWK, BROAD-WINGED HAWK, RED-TAILED HAWK, AMERICAN KESTREL, MERLIN, PEREGRINE FALCON,

SORA, AMERICAN COOT, SANDHILL CRANE, KILLDEER, SPOTTED SANDPIPER, LESSER YELLOWLEGS, PECTORAL SANDPIPER, RED-NECKED PHALAROPE, RING-BILLED GULL, HERRING GULL, GREAT BLACK-BACKED GULL,

ROCK PIGEON, MOURNING DOVE, YELLOW-BILLED CUCKOO, GREAT HORNED OWL, COMMON NIGHTHAWK, CHIMNEY SWIFT, RUBY-THROATED HUMMINGBIRD, BELTED KINGFISHER,

RED-HEADED WOODPECKER, RED-BELLIED WOODPECKER, YELLOW-BELLIED SAPSUCKER, DOWNY WOODPECKER, HAIRY WOODPECKER, NORTHERN FLICKER, PILEATED WOODPECKER,

OLIVE-SIDED FLYCATCHER, EASTERN WOOD-PEWEE, ACADIAN FLYCATCHER, LEAST FLYCATCHER, EASTERN PHOEBE, GREAT CRESTED FLYCATCHER, EASTERN KINGBIRD, WHITE-EYED VIREO, YELLOW-THROATED VIREO, BLUE-HEADED VIREO, WARBLING VIREO, RED-EYED VIREO, BLUE JAY, AMERICAN CROW,

TREE SWALLOW, NORTHERN ROUGH-WINGED SWALLOW, BARN SWALLOW, BLACK-CAPPED CHICKADEE, TUFTED TITMOUSE, RED-BREASTED NUTHATCH, WHITE-BREASTED NUTHATCH ,

CAROLINA WREN, HOUSE WREN, MARSH WREN, RUBY-CROWNED KINGLET, BLUE-GRAY GNATCATCHER, EASTERN BLUEBIRD, VEERY, SWAINSON’S THRUSH, WOOD THRUSH, AMERICAN ROBIN, GRAY CATBIRD, BROWN THRASHER, EUROPEAN STARTLING, CEDAR WAXWING,

NASHVILLE WARBLER, YELLOW WARBLER, CHESTNUT-SIDED WARBLER, MAGNOLIA WARBLER, BLACK-THROATED BLUE WARBLER, YELLOW-RUMPED WARBLER, BLACK-THROATED GREEN WARBLER, BLACKBURNIAN WARBLER, YELLOW-THROATED WARBLER, PALM WARBLER, BAY-BREASTED WARBLER, BLACKPOLL WARBLER, BLACK-AND-WHITE WARBLER, AMERICAN REDSTART, OVENBIRD, COMMON YELLOWTHROAT, HOODED WARBLER, WILSON’S WARBLER, CANADA WARBLER, SCARLET TANAGER,

EASTERN TOWHEE, CHIPPING SPARROW, FIELD SPARROW, SONG SPARROW, LINCOLN’S SPARROW,

SWAMP SPARROW, WHITE-THROATED SPARROW, WHITE-CROWNED SPARROW,

NORTHERN CARDINAL, ROSE-BREASTED GROSBEAK, INDIGO BUNTING, RED-WINGED BLACKBIRD, EASTERN MEADOWLARK, RUSTY BLACKBIRD, COMMON GRACKLE, BROWN-HEADED COWBIRD, BALTIMORE ORIOLE, HOUSE FINCH, AMERICAN GOLDFINCH, HOUSE SPARROW.

Birding with Limited Mobility or Endurance

http://comfortablebirdingforall.com

Wheelchair birding, birding on easy trails, and birding from a vehicle are included in this web site. A few of the closer parks, wildlife areas, and nature preserves listed are: Crane Creek State Park, Magee Marsh Wildlife Area, Maumee Bay State Park, and Sheldon Marsh State Nature Preserve.

TWO Camp Scholarships Available

By Dick Lee

            Black River Audubon Society members have been so impressed with the work of recent camp-scholarship recipients that the Board has decided to award two scholarships to attend next summer's Maine Audubon Camp at Hog Island. Campers spend one week learning from some of the most respected naturalists and environmental educators in the nation.

            Hog Island campers love the beautiful scenery, the natural setting of the 19th century buildings, and especially the delicious meals served family style in the communal dining room. Campers stay in cozy rooms with twin beds or in a dormitory.

            Days and evenings are spent attending hands-on workshops, hiking, birding, and exploring nearby islands. A usual highlight is the visit to Eastern Egg Island, where Atlantic Puffins were reestablished by Stephen Kress, National Audubon naturalist.

            The most popular camps are Field Ornithology and Workshop for Educators. Recent recipients include two park naturalists, two high school biology teachers, two junior high teachers, and an elementary school teacher. All possessed a desire to increase their knowledge and skills in teaching others in the community about conservation and restoration of our ecosystems.

            The scholarship pays tuition, including room and board. Recipients pay transportation costs.

If you have any questions or want an application form, please contact Dick Lee at 440-322-7449 or email LeeDck@aol.com.

Young Birders' Hike

September 9, 2007, Sandy Ridge Reservation

By Dick Lee

For two hours on an overcast day, LCMP naturalists Tim Fairweather and Gary Gerrone led six teens, one parent, and six Black River Audubon members on our inaugural hike for young birders. Species identified were:

            Canada Goose, Wood Duck, American Wigeon, Mallard, Northern Shoveler, Green-winged Teal, Great Blue Heron, Great Egret, Green Heron, Sora, Lesser Yellowlegs,

            Mourning Dove, Red-headed Woodpecker, Red-bellied Woodpecker, Hairy Woodpecker, Northern Flicker, Eastern Wood-Pewee, Warbling Vireo, Red-eyed Vireo,

Blue Jay, Black-capped Chickadee, Tufted Titmouse, White-breasted Nuthatch, Gray Catbird, European Starling, American Goldfinch

Birding by Tram

September 20, 2007, Sandy Ridge Reservation

By Harriet Alger

On a sunny, but misty day, with the temperature in the 70s, Jim Brown, Friends of Metro Parks volunteer, drove four physically challenged birders, accompanied by two not-so-challenged Black River Audubon members, either in the tram or on foot alongside, on our first Birding by Tram outing. Sandy Ridge Naturalist Casey Brooks joined the group.

The highlight was an eagle show. Two adult eagles, initially perched in trees, flew and dove toward the water. The successful female flew to a tree and proceeded to eat her large fish while the male perched above. Finally apparently satisfied, she moved over and allowed the male to finish the carcass. Then both flew over the tram.

Species identified:

            Canada Goose, Wood Duck, American Wigeon, Mallard, Northern Shoveler, Green-winged Teal, Great Blue Heron, Great Egret,

            Bald Eagle, Cooper's Hawk, American Kestrel, Peregrine Falcon, Sora, Killdeer, Mourning Dove, Chimney Swift, Belted Kingfisher, Red-headed Woodpecker, Downy Woodpecker, Northern Flicker,

            Eastern Phoebe, Blue Jay, Black-capped Chickadee, White-breasted Nuthatch, American Robin, European Starling, Yellow-rumped Warbler, Palm Warbler, Song Sparrow, Swamp Sparrow, Indigo Bunting, Red-winged Blackbird, American Goldfinch

October Field Trip

October 6, 2007, Carlisle Reservation

By Harry Spencer

On a fine sunny day with the temperature increasing from the 60s to the 70s, I led nine Black River Audubon members and two  visitors around the Meadow Loop starting from the Visitors' Center. Species identified:

Canada Goose, Mallard, Pied-billed Grebe, Turkey Vulture, Red-tailed Hawk, Killdeer, Mourning Dove, Chimney Swift, Belted Kingfisher,

Red-headed Woodpecker, Downy Woodpecker, Northern Flicker, Eastern Phoebe, Blue Jay, American Crow, Black-capped Chickadee, Tufted Titmouse, Red-breasted Nuthatch, White-breasted Nuthatch,

Eastern Bluebird, American Robin, Gray Catbird, Brown Thrasher, European Starling, Cedar Waxwing, Yellow-rumped Warbler, Palm Warbler, Common Yellowthroat,

Eastern Towhee, Song Sparrow, Lincoln's Sparrow, Swamp Sparrow, White-throated Sparrow, Northern Cardinal, Red-winged Blackbird, Common Grackle, Brown-headed Cowbird, American Goldfinch, House Sparrow

  • Western Reserve Land Conservancy

  • Firelands Chapter

    By Jack Smith

                 The mission statements of the Western Reserve Land Conservancy and the Black River Audubon Society focus on the future and complement each other in many aspects. WRLC "seeks to preserve the scenic beauty, rural character, and natural resources of northeast Ohio." BRAS aims "to promote conservation and restoration of ecosystems, focusing on birds and other wildlife through advocacy, education, stewardship, field trips, and programs for the benefit of all people of today and tomorrow." Both organizations recognize that humans need forests, grasslands, prairies, wetlands, and farm lands.

                With this convergence of purposes in mind, I want to describe some of the activities of WRLC, in whose Firelands Chapter I serve as trustee. Our area adjacent to the south shore of Lake Erie includes the watersheds of Rocky River, Black River, Beaver Creek, Vermilion River, Huron River, and Old Woman Creek.

    Within our area, and across the nation, the land uses and population distribution are changing rapidly. The rate of this change can be expected to increase as the population of the nation increases. Predictions are that the population may double in the foreseeable future.

                Through the use of conservation easements, the Western Reserve Land Conservancy facilitates preserving current land uses. Agriculture, woodland, and wetland areas are covered, for example. Conservation easements prevent new residential and commercial development, although with specifically stipulated exceptions.

                The restrictions imposed by conservation easements reduce significantly property market value. Few people are willing to absorb that financial sacrifice, so concerned legislators have created financial devices to mitigate losses in market value. Federal and state tax codes currently encourage conservation easements. Considerable benefit in estate taxes can be gained through the use of these easements attached to land deeds. Many easements qualify for federal and state grants to non-profit organizations, such as WRLC, with the proviso that the funds compensate the land owners for their market-value losses. Private donations to non-profit organizations can be used similarly.

    Each conservation easement requires a specified trustee, who oversees compliance with the terms of the easement, and WRLC often serves that function.

                WRLC was formed in 2006 by the merger of eight smaller northern Ohio land conservancies, one of which was the Firelands Land Conservancy, creating the largest land trust in Ohio. It is among the largest in the nation and has a staff of 22 employees including Andy McDowell, Firelands Chapter Field Director, and Kate Pilacky, Firelands Chapter Associate Field Director, and two attorneys.

                Since the merger Andy and Kate have been inundated with inquiries and requests, several of which probably will lead to conservation easements. Andy and Kate were part of a team that was rewarded recently with the successful conclusion of negotiations of a conservancy easement on more than 1000 acres in southern Lorain County. Currently Andy, Kate, and others are negotiating other easements covering many hundreds of acres.

                I am especially proud to have been a supporter and participant in the merger negotiations. WRLC now can maintain an outstanding staff, members of which have contributed immensely to the recent successes. Andy's and Kate's contagious enthusiasm and dedication are important factors in these recent successes. Also contributing greatly is the confidence of the staff buoyed by our large legal-defense fund.

                The land protected from development by conservation easements also protects wildlife habitats for the benefit of all people of today and tomorrow. Members of Audubon should be especially appreciative of the effectiveness of WRLC.

    Information about WRLC, conservation easements, tax considerations, and more can be found at www.wrlc,cc.

    Avian Snippets

    From the Cleveland Plain Dealer, October 13, 2007

    Black Duck

                A cold front sweeping through Canada the past week has ducks on the wing, migrating to Ohio and beyond.

                The most notable duck of the bunch is Black Duck 70375, which has a transmitter and antenna attached to its back last year at Ohio's Magee Marsh Wildlife Area. The duck had spent the summer on Hudson Bay, and got the urge to migrate with its mates on October 1. A day later, the duck was resting on the north side of Lake Superior. Back in the air October 3, the duck made it to the east side of Lake Huron on October 4 and arrived at the Magee Marsh Wildlife Area on October 5, ending a 1,200-mile journey.

    Nobel Laureate

                For 25 years, Doris Lessing has lived in a small row house in a North London neighborhood that abuts the cemetery where Sigmund Freud is buried. Each morning, the 87-year-old author of the best seller "The Golden Notebook" rises at 5 AM and feeds several hundred birds. She then returns home, makes breakfast and is usually at her desk by 9 AM.

                This week, she became the 11th woman to win the Nobel Prize in literature.

     

     

     

     

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